Gay Realty Network

Real Estate News With a Gay Slant

A New Bubble?

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Construction

Home values are appreciating faster than experts expected, rising almost 5 percent over the past year, according to the April Zillow Real Estate Market Reports. There are 3.4 percent fewer homes for sale in the U.S. than there were 12 months ago.

Zillow forecasted home values would grow 2 percent from April 2015 to April 2016, and outside housing experts said they expect slower growth in coming years. However, Zillow’s latest data show a different trend with home values currently appreciating at 4.9 percent — almost 3 percentage points faster than Zillow predicted a year ago — to a Zillow Home Value Index of $187,000.

Shrinking inventory is the story of the summer home shopping season for those looking to buy a home and entry-level homes have been hit the hardest; the number of entry-level homes for sale is down almost 8 percent over the past 12 months. Stiff competition and high demand, in addition to low inventory, stronger wage growth and low mortgage rates, are driving up home prices across the country, especially for entry-level homes, which is forcing many want-to-be-homeowners into bidding wars.

At Gay Realty Watch, we look for news to share with you about the gay real estate market – both lgbt real estate news and news specific to gay and lesbian real estate meccas.

Authored By Isaac M. O’Bannon
See the Full Story at CPA practice Advisor

Is San Diego Too Pricey?

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Hillcrest

The economy is looking up for many and according to the Case-Shiller index tracking resales of single family homes, this trend is being reflected in home prices. Nationally, prices are up 5 percent in the last 12 months, but in popular San Diego, that number is even higher. At a rise of 6.3 percent our fair city is still way under the leaders – Portland (up a staggering 12.3 percent) and her sister Seattle up over 10 percent. The reason for the rise? A generally upbeat and positive economic climate plus low mortgage interest rates and lower unemployment, at least in these leading markets.

So where does a budget conscious prospective homeowner turn for value?

The answer may be found in the northern suburb of Escondido with an average sales price of $415,000. With the San Diego median inching up to half a million (currently $490,000) there’s a saving to be found in this community for both families and retirees. Located 30 miles northeast of downtown San Diego, the city is located in a shallow valley surrounded by rocky hills. It is home to the San Diego Zoo’s Safari Park and the California Center for the Arts, and is a draw to tourists for its many local eateries and attractions. Festivals such as the “Cruisin’ Grand” featuring snazzy and retro automobiles and the “Grand Avenue Festival, held both fall and spring, lure visitors.

By Del Phillips – Full Story at LGBT Weekly

LGBT Weekly Gay Travel Resources

Pokemon Go A Real Estate Selling Point?

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Pokemon

Real estate agents are starting to jump on the Go bandwagon to try and sell homes.

Since the game’s release in early July, thousands of people have signed up for the game; by now, use time is allegedly higher than that of Whatsapp, Facebook and Twitter.

And as the small creatures once again take over millennials’ lives, much like they did nearly 20 years ago (feel old yet?), Pokémon Go opens up business opportunities.

Scrolling through Craigslist, countless ads reference the game, from San Francisco to New York City and presumably every other big city in between.

At Gay Realty Watch, we look for news to share with you about the gay real estate market – both lgbt real estate news and news specific to gay and lesbian real estate meccas.

Authored By Stefanie Gerdes
See the Full Story at Gay Star News

Linda Jain, Lesbian Ft. Lauderdale Real Estate Agent

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Linda Jain, Lesbian Ft. Lauderdale Real Estate AgentPeriodically we’ll feature one of our real estate professionals here to let our readers know about some great Realtors, Mortgage Brokers, and Other Real Estate Professionals:

Ft. Lauderdale Real Estate Agent Linda Jain knows the Fort Lauderdale and Wilton Manors real estate markets inside and out, and knows the importance of great customer service and residential building experience. These skills allow Linda help home sellers, buyers or investors to understand what’s going in the Lauderdale real estate market today.
Linda is a licensed Real Estate Salesperson with long, successful previous career in Customer Service. She brings her enthusiastic personality and service skills to the real estate market, working well with other agents and going beyond expectations for her clients. In this business, an agent thrives by creating long-term relationships, not just by closing individual transactions.

Linda has also had a license as a Code Inspector in Ithaca, New York – she knows how houses should be put together, an invaluable skill for her clients, especially when buying a new home.

Linda works hard, but takes a low-key approach with her clients – she is a good listener, both patient and understanding.

Linda received her BA in Public Administration at the State University of New York, and currently lives in Oakland Park, Florida.

If you are buying or selling a Fort Lauderdale home, give Linda a call.

See Linda’s Expanded Listing on Gay Realty Network Here

Gay Friendly Realtors and Real Estate Professionals in Ft. Lauderdale

The Strange Is Gone From San Francisco

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San Francisco

As I walk into the homey Inner Richmond apartment of Vetiver singer Andy Cabic three days before Christmas, the first thing I notice are the boxes lining the walls — an all too familiar sight in San Francisco these days. When asked about the changes the city has faced over the last five or so years, Cabic sighs and looks out the kitchen window toward the Presidio, a view that he soon would no longer be able to enjoy. “Artists would not be able to live here if it wasn’t for rent control,” he says. By New Year’s Eve, his apartment building will change ownership and Cabic will be forced to say goodbye to the railroad-style apartment where he and his partner Alissa have lived for more than a decade. Everything was still uncertain when I spoke with him, echoing a refrain that the displaced San Francisco band Two Gallants used as the title of their 2015 piano ballad, “There’s So Much I Don’t Know.”

This scenario has gone from regular occurrence to cliche; evictions in the Bay Area have become the norm when they were once the exception. As rents have risen to the highest in the country — skyrocketing well past New York City, according to Zumper’s National Rent Report from May 2016 — it has become increasingly expensive to live in San Francisco. The creative class has been hit hard, getting pushed to the outskirts of the city — most notably, the far western suburban Outer Sunset and southern Excelsior neighborhoods, both a considerable distance away from downtown. Many have crossed the San Francisco Bay to Oakland, where rents have been rising at an equal or faster rate over the past few years, now cracking the list of top-five most expensive cities in America. As a result of rent increases, Oakland has lost a quarter of its African-American population in the past decade alone. Many people have left the Bay Area altogether, journeying south to Los Angeles, north to Portland, or in some cases, across the country to New York.

It’s easy to focus on how the city itself has changed (just walk down the tree-lined and wine-bar-littered Valencia Street in the Mission), but hyper-gentrification has manifested itself in more subtle ways, cutting deep into the psyche of many musicians who once called the area home.

At Gay Realty Watch, we look for news to share with you about the gay real estate market – both lgbt real estate news and news specific to gay and lesbian real estate meccas.

Authored By Steven Edelstone
See the Full Story at Spin

Click here for gay realtors, mortgage lenders, and other real estate professionals in San Francisco

Chicago One of Slowest Metros in US to Recover

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Chicago

October 2003 stands out in Chicagoans’ memory for the Cubs’ infamous collapse one game shy of the World Series. Now there’s another reason to curse that month: Nearly 13 years later, local home values are about the same as they were at the time of that Cubs crash.

An index of Chicago-area single-family home values was at the same level in March as in October 2003, according to the S&P/Case-Shiller Indices released this week.

Though the Chicago residential market is recovering from the bust, Case-Shiller data show it’s coming back much more slowly than other metropolitan areas: Of the 20 major U.S. cities Case-Shiller tracks, only two are trapped further back in time: Detroit, whose price index is at February 2001 levels, and Cleveland, at February 2003.

Over the years since the bust, Chicago has struggled with a logjam of thousands of slow-to-sell new condos, a heavy load of foreclosures, higher-than-average unemployment and other factors as other cities moved forward.

At Gay Realty Watch, we look for news to share with you about the gay real estate market – both lgbt real estate news and news specific to gay and lesbian real estate meccas.

Authored By Dennis Rodkin
See the Full Story at the Chicago Real Estate Daily

Click here for gay realtors, mortgage lenders, and other real estate professionals in Illinois

Toronto and Vancouver Buyers Can’t Move Up, So They Renovate

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Toronto, ON, Canada

Defeated house hunters in Toronto and Vancouver who feel that the supply of affordable homes must be shrinking aren’t entirely imagining the phenomenon.

Beata Caranci, chief economist at Toronto-Dominion Bank, says the houses listed for sale are increasingly tilted towards the upper end of the market. Her report, entitled Moving on the Monopoly Board: Buyer Gridlock in the Toronto and Vancouver Housing Markets, illustrates how the change is shifting the way people get onto the property ladder and how they climb up once they get there.

Ms. Caranci was prompted to drill into the numbers behind the vanishing listings after hearing so much about the lack of supply that continually frustrates house hunters in the two cities. “You keep hearing it’s a sellers’ market but the sellers have to go somewhere.” Ms. Caranci says it’s still common for people to buy an entry-level home with the thought of trading up as babies come along, incomes rise or other lifestyle changes unfold.

At Gay Realty Watch, we look for news to share with you about the gay real estate market – both lgbt real estate news and news specific to gay and lesbian real estate meccas.

Authored By Carolyn Ireland
See the Full Story at Globe and Mail

Click here for gay realtors, mortgage lenders, and other real estate professionals in Ontario

Everyone’s Moving to Oregon

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Gay Portland Real EstateA confluence of factors — including low supply, high demand, obstructive regulations and lacking infrastructure — is driving up housing prices in the state, a panel of state economists and housing experts told a legislative committee Tuesday, May 24.

“There are too few units given the strong and growing demand,” said Josh Lehner, economist with the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis. “In such a market, anything available at a remotely reasonable price and/or location is gone instantaneously. The lack of supply drives prices higher.”

Panelists recommended a series of policy changes, many of which lay outside the Legislature’s control. Local zoning laws, permitting rules and even the state labor commissioner’s interpretation of prevailing wage law for residential construction projects can drive up the cost and time it takes to build units, said Kurt Creager, director of Portland Housing Bureau.

“Who moves to Oregon? The short answer is everyone moves to Oregon,” Lehner said.

At Gay Realty Watch, we look for news to share with you about the gay real estate market – both lgbt real estate news and news specific to gay and lesbian real estate meccas.

Authored By Paris Achen
See the Full Story at Portland Tribune

Click here for gay realtors, mortgage lenders, and other real estate professionals in Oregon

Prices Surging for Philly Home Sales

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Philadelphia Real Estate

Home values in a highly competitive Philadelphia Real Estate market – newly reclassified by the real estate search engine Zillow as “very hot” – finished the first quarter of 2016 higher than the peak the Philadelphia Real Estate market reached just before the housing bubble burst in 2007.

“[This] implies that all of the losses in house values due to the bubble’s deflation and subsequent recession have now been recovered. The average Philadelphia home has achieved a new all-time high in value,” said Kevin Gillen, chief economist for Meyers Research and senior research fellow at Drexel University’s Lindy Institute for Urban Innovation.

At Gay Realty Watch, we look for news to share with you about the gay real estate market – both lgbt real estate news and news specific to gay and lesbian real estate meccas.

Authored By Alan J. Heavens
See the Full Story at Philly.com

Click here for gay realtors, mortgage lenders, and other real estate professionals in Pennsylvania

Why Washington DC is the Best City for Gays

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Victory_Fund_National_Champagne_Brunch_and_Stonewall_Kickball_and_Wilson_Phillips_and_Dupont_Circle_split_insert_c_Washington_Blade_by_Michael_Key

New York? Yawn. San Francisco? It’s been overrun by tech junkies. Chicago? Might as well be Shreveport.

The jury is officially in, via my Facebook page, and Washington, D.C., has been declared the best city to be gay. But what makes our nation’s capital the ideal urban fruitopia for the LGBT community? Succinctly, today’s Washington is the perfect coming together of vibrant neighborhoods, good restaurants, nightlife, events and cute guys.

Gay sports leagues, happy hours, a growing theater scene — all of this gives D.C. a certain gay camaraderie that other cities seem to lack. Plus, this city makes brunching an Olympic sport. Here are nine reasons of why you shouldn’t waste your time with any other city.

#9 There Are More of Us Here. There’s no denying that. Even though we aren’t a state, yet, D.C. has the largest percentage of gays and lesbians in the United States. Bringing up the rear, so to speak, North Dakota.

At Gay Realty Watch, we look for news to share with you about the gay real estate market – both lgbt real estate news and news specific to gay and lesbian real estate meccas.

Authored By Brock Thompson
See the Full Story at The Washington Blade

Click here for gay realtors, mortgage lenders, and other real estate professionals in Washington DC